Lymphoma in cats symptoms


Lymphoma in cats symptoms | Types of lymphoma in cats

The first recorded case of feline lymphoma was that of a domestic short hr, an 18-year-old male cat, with a history of poor hr quality, loss of weight, and general lethargy. The cat also had a pnful lesion of the tongue and, following histological examination, was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Treatment consisted of a combination of chemotherapy and total mouth and tongue removal. The cat was euthanized 10 days after completion of the combined treatment. At the necropsy, a firm, well-circumscribed grey-white tumour was found on the ventral surface of the tongue (Figure 1.1A). The cat also had many similar tumours on the submucosa of the stomach, small intestine, and colon, and a larger lesion on the mesenteric lymph node. The lymph node was firm and well-circumscribed and was measuring 7 cm long and 6 cm in diameter. The surrounding lymph nodes appeared normal (Figure 1.1B). Histological examination revealed that the larger mass had typical features of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Histology of the second lesion was consistent with the diagnosis of lymphoma (Figure 1.2).1,2

Figure 1.1 Gross appearance of the tongue mass. A) Small, grey-white, ill-circumscribed, firm nodule of the ventral surface of the tongue of a cat with a history of oral clinical disease. B) Normal appearance of a similar nodule of the ventral surface of the tongue of a cat that was found to have a similar lesion of lymphoma on histology.

Source: Figures 1.1A and B taken from: Chapple PJ, Macintyre PJ. The clinical disease and the treatment of feline diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In: Bekri D, editor. Diseases of the cat: the clinical approach. 2nd ed. New York: Lippincott Williams &, Wilkins, 2009. p. 557-566.

Figure 1.2 Histopathology of the tongue mass. A) Diffuse infiltrate of lymphoid cells into the stratum malpighii of the tongue. B) Lymphoid cells have a centrocyte or centroblast morphology.

Source: Figures 1.2A and B adapted from: Chapple PJ, Macintyre PJ. The clinical disease and the treatment of feline diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In: Bekri D, editor. Diseases of the cat: the clinical approach. 2nd ed. New York: Lippincott Williams &, Wilkins, 2009. p. 557-566.

## REFERENCES

1. Chapple PJ, Macintyre PJ. The clinical disease and the treatment of feline diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In: Bekri D, editor. Diseases of the cat: the clinical approach. 2nd ed. New York: Lippincott Williams &, Wilkins, 2009. p. 557-566.

2. Ferreira-Pinto CM, Marques R, Murta M, Santos MJ, Alves RR, Mariz T. A comparative analysis of the histopathologic features of lymphoma in domestic animals. Acta Veterinaria Brasil. 2016,31(1):35–40.

3. Marraffa R, De Cremoux E, Nisnevich V, et al. Differentiation of canine lymphomas of large cells according to the cell of origin. The histological and immunohistochemical profile of canine large cell lymphomas: a retrospective study of 50 cases. Vet Haematol Oncol. 2015,11(1):43–51.

4. Murta M, Santos MJ, Rondon G, Marques R. Canine lymphomas: a review of 110 cases (2000–2014). J Vet Intern Med. 2015,29(2):265–271.

# CHAPTER 13

Behavior and Mood Disorders

_Miguel A. Garcia-Arencibia, M.D., Ph.D._

_University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Memphis, TN, USA_

## ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to express my gratitude to the patients and owners of animals affected with behavioral problems. I would like to dedicate this chapter to Dr. Rhea White for her guidance and support.

I would like to acknowledge the following people who have provided me with support and education: Dr. L.J. Wegmann, Dr. N. DeBattista, Dr. E.E. Eichenseer, Dr. J.M. Foulkes, Dr. M.A. Landa, Dr. S.K. Stagg, and Dr. C.A. Wooten.

## CLINICAL IMPRESSIONS

Behavior and mood disorders are the most common reason for consultation in pets and the presenting complnt that leads to the majority of diagnostic workups. Although diagnosis of such conditions can be achieved through history and physical examination, complementary diagnostic imaging can support the diagnosis of some of these conditions. The majority of patients diagnosed with these disorders will have been referred to a veterinary specialist ( _vide infra_ ). This chapter covers the most common behavioral and mood disorders seen in dogs and cats. Although it is possible to perform similar diagnostic procedures in both dogs and cats, it may be difficult to convince owners to transport their pets to veterinary hospitals for such investigations.

## BASIC PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

Understanding the basic neurobiology of behavior and mood is an important first step toward a diagnostic approach. The central nervous system (CNS) has three mn components: the brn, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves (see Figure 1.2). The brn (cerebrum) contns the majority of the brn structures responsible for all cognitive functions, such as motor coordination, emotional responses, and higher reasoning. The spinal cord and peripheral nerves are involved in the coordination and execution of the various functions that together form the motor system. The brn is enclosed by two membranes ( _cerebrospinal fluid [CSF]_ and _arachnoid_ ) that protect the brn, prevent the accumulation of metabolic wastes and toxins, and provide a nutrient-rich and oxygenated environment.

**Figure 1.2** The three components of the central nervous system. The brn (cerebrum), spinal cord, and peripheral nerves comprise the central nervous system.

Because the majority of brn functions are carried out in the cortex, the "thinking" brn, there is little room for the movement of the body. The body is therefore controlled by the autonomic (involuntary) nervous system


Watch the video: What You Need To Know About Feline Intestinal Lymphoma: VLOG 98


Previous Article

Sleeping kitten dreams of a dancer career

Next Article

Dr. Roberta Relford, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM, DAVCP

Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos